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JAMP logo Joint Admission Medical Program Making the path to medical school a reality for Texans since 2003

Rambod Aznavaleh

Rambod Aznavaleh

Rambod Aznavaleh

Hometown:
Tehran, Iran – San Antonio

Undergraduate University:
UT San Antonio

Medical School:
Texas Tech – El Paso

As a college student living at home, I am appreciative of the summer internships JAMP provided around the state of Texas. Twice for five weeks, I experienced living in a different city and interning with other like-minded individuals who come from similar disadvantaged backgrounds.

 

How has JAMP helped you strive to achieve your goal of becoming a doctor?

Because of JAMP, my understanding of medicine has flourished. As a pre-medical student, JAMP has given me the resources and tools to overcome many of the obstacles I have faced in my journey to medical school. The program invests a great deal of time and money into developing us as individuals. Some of these resources include: scholarships, personal competency workshops, summer internships, Kaplan MCAT courses, and stipends to ease the burden of finances.

I am truly thankful for all the opportunities I have been given. The program’s investment in me helped cultivate my academic and non-academic competencies, and has guaranteed me interviews at the program’s nine affiliated Texas medical schools. I have witnessed first-hand a doctor’s daily routine and their responsibilities through my preceptorships, and received valuable feedback in all my JAMP activities. These experiences have helped me flourish as a student and person.

 

What advice would you like to offer current or future JAMP students?

Many students may not be fully aware of all the resources JAMP provides, or may fail to take advantage of them. My best piece of advice would be to take full advantage of all the resources offered and build on the foundation that JAMP has laid out for you. Engage with others in the program, and network where you can to help you succeed. Time management is crucial during MCAT preparation, and building an effective routine early can translate to sustained success in medical school.

Stay true and humble among your peers, and always remember where you are from, where you are going, and where you want to be. Ask questions regularly and listen to the advice of your mentors. Remember to self-evaluate regularly and reflect on yourself. You must take care of yourself to successfully take care of others. Lastly, enjoy the ride! The path may be long and arduous, but that does not mean you cannot have fun. I wish you the best of luck.

 

What aspect of JAMP has been most beneficial to you?

As a college student living at home, I am appreciative of the summer internships JAMP provided around the state of Texas. Twice for five weeks, I experienced living in a different city and interning with other like-minded individuals who come from similar disadvantaged backgrounds. I took classes in anatomy and physiology, as well as cell and molecular biology to enrich my understanding of basic sciences for the MCAT and beyond. In addition, I learned vital clinical skills from medical students and faculty.

Aside from academic enrichment, these internships provided stipends for food and free housing. I also had the opportunity to shadow multiple clinical specialties and build a sense of comradery with people I would not have met otherwise. I experienced a short snippet of what life would be like in medical school and learned to adapt to its challenges by working with my peers. During the free time given, I enjoyed the boom and bustle of a new city with those same peers, as well as various program coordinators, alumni, and faculty. The relationships I made through these internships left me with many life-long friends, adventures, and experiences. I can firmly say that this program has made me a better person.

 

Short biography:

I am an immigrant from Tehran, Iran, and have traveled through Turkey and Germany on my way to the United States. As an Iranian-American, I have strong ties to my family, and attribute a great deal of my accomplishments to their sacrifices. I am particularly grateful to my sister for introducing me to the medical field after high school. I am a first-generation college student attending the University of Texas at San Antonio. My major is Neurobiology, and I also dabble in the College of Business as a Business Administration Minor.

I was introduced to JAMP thanks to my University Health Professions Office, and they have supported me ever since. My first internship was at UNT Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNT-TCOM) in Fort Worth, and my second internship was at Texas Tech University Paul L. Foster School of Medicine in El Paso. I look forward to a life of learning and professionalism as I continue through to medical school, residency, and beyond. I aspire to make a difference in my community, and am grateful that JAMP has helped make my dreams of becoming a physician a reality.